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SHADES OF CARE:

Understanding how BIPOC* mothers and children experience
pediatric care in Ontario, Canada

*Black, Indigenous and People of Colour

 

PROJECT SUMMARY:

"Shades of Care" is a qualitative research study whose aim is to further understandings of how BIPOC mothers and children experience pediatric care in Ontario. This study frames participants as storytellers whose voices deserve to be heard, and utilizes semi-structured interviews to allow mothers to openly share their experiences with pediatric care.

STUDY INFORMATION:

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BACKGROUND

Race and ethnicity are determinants of health which play significant roles in shaping the quality of care and health outcomes for a child. BIPOC families disproportionately experience barriers in accessing and receiving pediatric care across Canada. The effects of these barriers are further pronounced when it is the child’s mother who serves as their proxy. This ultimately and unjustly sets BIPOC children on a trajectory for negative health outcomes unless corrected by care providers and stakeholders.

ANTICIPATED CONTRIBUTIONS

Contributions of this research are 3-pronged:

(1) Enhancing cross-cultural understanding

(2) Identifying the healthcare needs of pediatric patients and their families

(3) Informing clinical practice.


This study will also provide direction as to what sorts of approaches must be taken in order to sustainably implement culturally safe pediatric care in Ontario.

PARTICIPATION

Who can participate?

(1) BIPOC mothers who have required pediatric care for their child between 0-5 years AND

(2) Have resided in Ontario for

at least 6 months

How will you participate?

Participating in a 1-on-1 interview (approximately 45-60 minutes in length) via video call or over-the-phone

Scientist on Tablet

CONTACT ME

Thank you for your interest in my research. Please do get in touch with any questions or comments regarding my work and publications. I’d love to hear from you.

Raisa Ladha

School of Public Health and Health Systems

Faculty of Applied Health Sciences

University of Waterloo